Priority 2: Law enforcement & criminal justice
To promote an improved law enforcement and criminal justice response across the UK, to support development and adoption of effective training and to drive improvements in data collection

Why law enforcement & criminal justice response?


At present modern slavery in the UK is viewed by criminals as a high profit and low risk crime. In 2014 the Home Office estimated that there were between 10,000 – 13,000 potential victims of modern slavery across the UK. In the same year, just 2,340 potential victims were referred to the National Referral Mechanism.

 

Very few modern slavery crimes come to the attention of police and criminal justice agencies, and minimal modern slavery offenders are caught and convicted. The Modern Slavery Act has given law enforcement and prosecutors the tools they need; it is essential that they now use these tools to their full effect. Proactive policing and rapid, sustained responses that disrupt entire criminal networks are particularly important in investigating this serious and often organised crime. If traffickers are not relentlessly pursued they will simply continue to source and exploit more victims.

 

Evaluating law enforcement responses across the UK will enable the identification of best practice and examination of areas where there must be improvement.

Areas of focus


Related News & Insights


News | 17 May 2018
Today I have announced my resignation as the UK's first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner.
News | 11 May 2018
The Human Trafficking Foundation is undertaking a mapping exercise of the support services available to survivors of modern slavery throughout the UK.
News | 17 April 2018
A short online survey has been launched to better understand the work being done by UK anti-slavery and anti-trafficking civil society organisations. The survey is part of a new report by the Rights Lab at the University of Nottingham. The report will...
News | 11 April 2018
Slavery is a serious crime affecting millions worldwide and thousands here in the UK – for it to be stopped, experts need to know what research is available to inform the anti-slavery fight. For the first time, this is possible.   A new report published...
News | 09 April 2018
In partnership with the Rights Lab at the University of Nottingham, in 2017 the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner launched research looking into modern slavery partnerships across the UK. Together with the Rights Lab, the Commissioner is now...
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