Priority 4: Private sector engagement
To engage with the private sector to promote policies to ensure that supply chains are free from slavery and to encourage effectual transparency reporting

Why private sector engagement?


In 2012 the International Labour Organization (ILO) conservatively estimated that there were 21 million victims of forced labour, a form of modern slavery, across the world, and the majority of these victims are exploited in private sector activities such as manufacturing, construction and agriculture. Modern slavery is big business: in 2014 the ILO estimated that the total illegal profits obtained from the use of forced labour worldwide amount to over US $150 billion per year.

As supply chains have globalised and demand for cheap products and ever cheaper labour has continued to increase, the risks of slavery in supply chains, in the UK and internationally, have become much greater. Slavery in the supply chain is an abuse of human rights in the pursuit of profits and the private sector has a duty to ensure it is not tolerated.

Areas of focus


Related News & Insights


News | 17 October 2017
Following the launch of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner's 2017 Annual Report, the Commissioner spoke to the Evening Standard on the impact of the media and the success of their special investigation into modern slavery.  The Commissioner also...
News | 16 October 2017
Today the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner launched his Annual Report, detailing activities in the anti-slavery fight since October 2016. The Report covers work under his 5 priority areas - Victim identification and care Law enforcement and...
News | 16 October 2017
The Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner's 2017 Annual Report reveals that police forces have improved their response to the crime of modern slavery. Police Professional reports on the Commissioner's bi-annual data request, revealing that crime records...
News | 11 October 2017
The Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner provided the Independent with indicators of modern slavery. An investigation was carried out and found that exploitation is rife in car washes across London. You can read the full article here.  
News | 27 September 2017
Once upon a time, a trip to the local car wash involved buying a token, driving into a fixed machine and sitting patiently while two large, colourful brushes whizzed back and forth until the vehicle was clean.   Nowadays, it is more likely to comprise a...
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